Employees Call for More Technology Advances in the Workplace

Employees Call for More Technology Advances in the Workplace

Many employees believe their current workplace is not yet making effective use of the latest technology advances, but expect that in the future these advances will provide them with both quality-of-life and productivity benefits, the results of a global survey conducted by technology providers Dell and Intel showed.

The survey, conducted between April 5 and May 3, 2016, asked 3,801 full-time employees at companies of all sizes and in a range of industries across 10 countries (US, UK, France, Germany, Japan, Brazil, China, India, Canada, and South Africa) for their views on how global technology trends are changing their workplace.

Researchers observed that collaborative tools and innovative technologies, such as the internet of things (IoT) and virtual reality (VR), are expected to become widespread in the workplace of the near future. The survey found that 66% of respondents would be willing to use augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR) technologies in their professional role, and that 46% believe these technologies will improve their work productivity. Meanwhile, 62% said they believe that the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) will make their job easier, while 50% said they think AI will lead to more productivity in the workplace, with 30% citing the ability to automate complex or repetitive tasks as the major immediate advantage.

The survey findings revealed that 44% of respondents believe their current workplace is not smart enough, with many of the employees polled expressing a desire for an environment that uses data to make “smarter” decisions about conditions like temperature and lighting. The results also showed, however, that more than half of respondents believe that within the next five years they will be working in a smart office (57%) and will have access to advanced technologies that make face-to-face meetings redundant (51%). While 57% of the employees surveyed said they still prefer to have face-to-face conversations with colleagues, half of all respondents and three in five millennial respondents (under age 35) said they think better communication technologies and remote teams will make face-to-face conversation obsolete in the near future.

The results also indicated that expectations that technology will change the workplace are especially high among millennial workers, with 69% of these respondents saying they expect to be in a smart office within the next five years, and 42% saying they would quit a job with substandard technology.

In addition, the survey showed that remote employment and flexible working is increasingly enabling workers to focus on both productivity and quality of life benefits, and that employers are offering more flexible work arrangements to cater to mobile workers. More than half (52%) of respondents said they already work outside of a traditional office at least one day a week, while 18% reported that they are working from a public location every week.

The survey also found that a majority of workers place an emphasis on functional benefits, with 63% of millennials and 55% of older workers (over age 35) indicating they would rather have high-tech perks, such as access to AR/VR and IoT tools, than low-tech perks like ping pong and free food.

Benefits Trends, Volume 59, Issue 8

The information contained in this post is for general use, and while we believe all information to be reliable and accurate, it is important to remember individual situations may be entirely different. The information provided is not written or intended as tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for purposes of avoiding any Federal tax penalties. Individuals are encouraged to seek advice from their own tax or legal counsel. The information in this post is written and published by Liberty Publishing, Inc., Beverly, MA. Copyright © 2016 Liberty Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.

Workplace Giving Programs Can Help Attract and Retain Talent

Workplace Giving Programs Can Help Attract and Retain Talent

Research shows that effective corporate giving programs are beneficial for a range of stakeholders, including the company, employee donors, and the benefitting charities, according to a recently published analysis by corporate philanthropy software provider JK Group.

In an article entitled, “The Future of Employee Benefits: Employee Giving Programs,” JK Group director of client strategy Nita Kirby cited research showing that the presence of corporate philanthropy programs has the potential to increase revenue by up to 20%, reduce staff turnover by up to 50%, and can even have an effect on the overall mood and health of employees.

Kirby also reported that the results of a survey conducted by JK Group showed that employers recognize the benefits of strong employee giving programs, with over 80% of the participating companies and organizations agreeing or strongly agreeing that their company is committed to a giving program. The survey findings further suggested that employee giving affects a company’s ability to attract and retain talent.

In addition, Kirby cited a 2015 report that showed that 61% of millennials would rather work for a company that offers volunteering opportunities or a giving program, such as volunteer time off, skill-based and pro bono volunteerism, and matching gifts.

Kirby also outlined several steps companies interested in incorporating giving and volunteering into their employee benefit programs can take. For example, employers can find out what type of programs solicit the strongest interest from their employees using free survey tools available online, and can then use the results of the survey to identify an employee advocate to support the program, and to help introduce the program to the rest of the workforce.

In addition, she advised companies to team up with partners associated with providing software and services that offer a user-friendly environment that allows employers to speak to their employees in their own unique way. To improve the chances that the programs will be supported and recognized by the entire company, she suggested that employers consider getting marketing, communications, compliance, and IT involved in supporting and promoting the philanthropy programs.

Finally, Kirby recommended that when it comes time to finally implement corporate giving programs, employers should look at a number of issues, such as whether they are adequately informed about all of the charities that might be in line with the philanthropic interests of their employees, and how legitimate the charities that are being considered for the company’s corporate giving programs are. To ensure that employees have peace of mind that their donations are ending up in the right hands and that their financial security has not been breached, Kirby advised employers to investigate the safest way to facilitate employee giving.

From Benefit Trends Newsletter, Volume 59, Issue 6

The information contained in this newsletter is for general use, and while we believe all information to be reliable and accurate, it is important to remember individual situations may be entirely different. The information provided is not written or intended as tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for purposes of avoiding any Federal tax penalties. Individuals are encouraged to seek advice from their own tax or legal counsel. This newsletter is written and published by Liberty Publishing, Inc., Beverly, MA. Copyright © 2016 Liberty Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.